02380 779 753 admin@pcp-scitt.org.uk

Apprenticeship End Point Assessment

Primary Catholic Partnership Post-Graduate Teaching Apprenticeship

 

End Point Assessment Offer

 

The Primary Catholic Partnership is a long-standing provider of initial teacher training which has been rated “Outstanding” by OFSTED since 2005, with the most recent inspection report being published in January 2019 ( https://reports.ofsted.gov.uk/provider/41/70089 ). We are registered on RoATP for the PGTA and since September 2018 we have been delivering PGTA apprenticeship training, working closely with partner schools and local authorities.

We are registered as an independent end point assessor organisation (EPAO), able to draw on our years of experience in ITT, whilst also benefitting from our current experience in working with PGTAs and their schools.

Below is an outline of our offer. Much of this reflects and draws from the Institute For Apprenticeships Assessment Plan document for the postgraduate teaching apprenticeship (SG0490/AP01).

Overview Of End-Point Assessment

Having completed a programme of ITE and obtained QTS, the apprentice will reach a gateway to end-point assessment.

  • The trainee continues employment and training with the employer as a Newly Qualified Teacher or may take employment with another employer for their NQT year.
  • All entry and gateway requirements are met, including evidence of achieving level 2 English and Maths.
  • The employer (with advice from the training provider) decides whether the apprentice is ready for the gateway and notifies the independent assessment organisation.

The independent assessor conducts the end-point assessment and gives each element of the assessment a mark. This assessment will comprise of:

  • A lesson observation observed and assessed by the independent assessor. The apprentice will produce a lesson plan according to the employer’s format, which will be given to the independent assessor prior to the lesson observation. The independent assessor will have a brief discussion prior the observed lesson, followed by a short professional dialogue about the lesson after the observation.
  • A professional discussion will take place to assess the apprentices’ knowledge, skills and behaviours with regard to the Teachers’ Standards. The professional discussion will be held between the apprentice and a panel, composed of the independent assessor, a representative from the apprenticeship training provider and a representative from the employer who has been involved in the apprentice’s training and development (such as professional mentor or support tutor). The independent assessor will assess the content of the professional discussion. The apprentice should bring with them a portfolio of work completed during Initial Teaching Training. The portfolio will not be assessed but will provide the apprentice with an aid to the professional discussion.
  • Having examined and assessed the evidence from the lesson observation and the professional discussion, the independent assessor awards the apprentice a final grade: outstanding, pass or inadequate.
  • The apprenticeship is complete.
  • Successful apprentices are awarded their apprenticeship certificate.

Administering the End-Point Assessment

When the employer judges that gateway requirements have been met, the gateway is triggered. The employer will select an End-Point Assessment Organisation from the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Register of Apprentice Assessment Organisations. The independent assessor must not be involved in any on-programme training, development or on-programme review/assessment of the apprentice, nor can they be the apprentice’s employer.

Once the gateway has been reached, the end-point assessment must be completed within three months. The assessment organisation decides when the end-point assessment is to occur, with the exact date and timing of the assessment to be agreed between the apprentice and the assessment organisation. The assessment will take place in the educational setting in which the training/employment has taken place or at another place of employment (an alternative educational setting). The employer will facilitate the taking of the end-point assessment.

The employer is responsible for ensuring that the apprentice has met all the gateway requirements. The independent assessor is responsible for verifying this, prior to administering the end-point assessment.

The lesson observation with professional dialogue should be conducted ahead of the professional discussion. It is expected that, typically, both assessments will be conducted on the same day where appropriate.

At the conclusion of the end-point assessment, the independent assessor collates the evidence and determines the final grading of the apprenticeship. The apprentice needs to pass each assessment in order to pass the EPA overall. The grading decision is made solely by the independent assessor.

Once the apprentice has completed the end-point assessment, the independent assessor will take the appropriate amount of time needed to assess the evidence, decide the final grade, and adhere to the relevant quality assurance procedures. Having done this, the assessment organisation will inform the apprentice whether they have passed, and of their final grade.

The apprentice is permitted to retake the end-point assessment after 1 month and within 6 months of the failed end-point assessment but not after 6 months (unless the apprentice is deferred due to sickness or maternity leave, which is to be determined by the assessment organisation). The apprentice is permitted to re-take the fail component(s) of the end-point assessment once within the permitted timeframe.

 

Lesson Observation with Professional Dialogue

The lesson observation will assess the apprentice’s ability to meet the Teachers’ Standards, with particular focus on

Teacher Standard 4:

Plan and teach well- structured lessons

  • Impart knowledge and develop understanding through effective use of lesson time; and
  • Promote a love of learning and children’s intellectual curiosity.

The independent assessor will observe one of the apprentice’s lessons, with the lesson observation lasting a minimum of 45 and a maximum of 60 minutes. This should be with the trainee’s main class (primary) or a known class regularly taught (secondary) unless there is good reason to observe an alternative class (as approved by the independent assessor). The apprentice will present the independent assessor with a range of three lessons that can be observed, with the specific lesson to be observed to be agreed between the apprentice and independent assessor, to ensure it is at a date and time that is mutually convenient. Prior to the discussion, the apprentice will be given time to reflect and evaluate their lesson.

The apprentice will have to produce a lesson plan, according to the employer’s format, which will be given to the independent assessor immediately prior to the lesson observation. The plan for the observed lesson should detail where the lesson fits within the context of a learning sequence.

Following the lesson, the independent assessor and apprentice will conduct a professional dialogue about the observed lesson. This discussion will last typically for 15 minutes and provide the apprentice with an opportunity to reflect on the lesson, as well as discussing evidence of impact on pupil progress.

The assessor opens the discussion with a question specifically linked to learning, for example:

  • “Which part of your lesson had the most impact on pupil progress?”
  • “Please explain why you think this.”

The discussion should cover the lesson across a range of areas relating to the standards, with the following areas suggestions for topics of discussion. A minimum of two appropriate topics should be covered:

  • Resources, classroom organisation, equipment and planning;
  • Clarity and achievability of learning objectives and success criteria;
  • Teaching input;
  • Personalised learning;
  • Pupil engagement and behaviour for learning;
  • Subject knowledge and pedagogic understanding; and
  • Pupil progress.

The lesson will be graded in line with the grades set out below. Judgements against the Teachers’ Standards should:

  • Use examples and evidence of impact to clarify and support judgments, especially relating to pupil progress;
  • Provide sufficient evidence to support a judgment, but make comments that are concise and in the third person; and
  • Detail any weaknesses that make the lesson or any standard less than ‘Pass’.

 

Professional Discussion

The professional discussion will assess the apprentice’s knowledge, skills and behaviours with regard to the Teachers’ Standards. The independent assessor will choose four of the standards below to discuss, with the specific knowledge, skills and behaviours for each standard set out in table 1 above:

  • Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils
  • Promote good progress and outcomes by pupils
  • Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge
  • Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils
  • Make accurate and productive use of assessment
  • Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment
  • Fulfil wider professional responsibilities

They will also assess the trainee’s professional and personal behaviours contained in Part 2 of the Teachers’ Standards, with the specific behaviours set out in table 2 above.

The professional discussion will typically last for 60 minutes, with approximately 10 minutes spent on each chosen standard, and 15 minutes spent on Part 2 (professional and personal behaviours set out in table 2 above).

The panel will be compromised of:

  • the independent assessor (chair);
  • a representative from the apprenticeship training provider; and
  • a representative from the apprentice’s employer involved in their training and development (such as professional mentor or support tutor).

The independent assessor will lead the professional discussion. The employer representative and training provider representative will assist with facilitating the discussion, by asking questions drawn from the question banks relevant to each specific standards. Agreement on who will ask which questions is to be reached prior to the discussion.

The role of the independent assessor is to consider all relevant evidence and make an independent judgment on how well the trainee has met the Teachers’ Standards. The independent assessor will give the professional discussion a mark in line with the grades outlined in table 1 above and in the ‘end-point grading’ section below.

Assessors should begin by assessing the trainee’s professional and personal behaviours contained in table 2. They should ask the following required question at the beginning of the professional discussion:

“Please provide evidence demonstrating how you meet the Professional Standards expected of a teacher as described in Part 2 of the Teachers’ Standards.”

They will then move on to discuss the four standards chosen from above. Other questions are expected to cover a range of development areas, including:

  • How the trainee has built mutually respectful relationships that impact on overall expectations;
  • Examples of pupil progress from known starting points;
  • Strategies used during the year to enhance subject knowledge and pedagogy;
  • How school based tasks and assignments have enabled the trainee to demonstrate Teachers’ Standards;
  • How reflective practice has enabled the trainee to develop more engaging lessons;
  • Different teaching strategies and their impact on the learning of a range of pupils;
  • How the trainee has provided feedback and its effectiveness;
  • How the trainee has taken decisive action in situations of unusually challenging behaviour; and
  • What are the next areas for further development, and why.

The assessment organisation will develop a question bank for each component of the Teachers’ Standards, which should be used to prompt the discussion, with the portfolio of evidence used by the apprentice to support them during the discussion. As the apprenticeship will be reviewed in one year, the question bank will have a lifespan of one year.

The apprentice will have compiled the portfolio of evidence throughout their initial teacher training. The apprentice should bring along their portfolio of evidence to aid them in discussion, and so that they can refer the assessor to particular elements when they are evidencing their responses to questions. The portfolio will not be graded, but the professional discussion regarding the portfolio will be.

The portfolio must include evidence demonstrating how the trainee has met the knowledge, skills, and behaviours set out in the Teachers’ Standards. It must include:

  • A sample of the trainee’s lesson plans, demonstrating a breadth of teaching methods used to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils, as well as the impact planning and teaching has had on pupils’ progress;
  • How the apprentice has used data on pupils’ progress;
  • Examples of the trainee’s assessment system;
  • A reflective journal kept throughout the year or evidence of written assignments; and
  • Written lesson observations from the trainees’ Mentor.

 

Independence

The end-point assessment is carried out by staff from independent end-point assessment organisations on the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Register of Apprentice Assessment Organisations. Representatives from the employer and the apprenticeship training provider will assist in asking questions during the professional discussion. However, the final decision on the grade of the professional discussion and lesson observation with a professional dialogue, and whether the apprentice has passed the end-point assessment, rests with the independent assessor from the apprentice assessment organisation.

Roles and Responsibilities

 

In Summary

Apprentice

 

 

·Participates fully in their training and development

·Contributes actively to their performance review

·Contributes to the decision on the timing of their end-point assessment

 

Apprentice’s Employer ·Chooses assessment provider from the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s register of Apprentice Assessment Organisations

·Supports the apprentice throughout their training and development

·Conducts reviews to monitor progress

·Determines when the apprentice is competent, meets the requirements of the gateway, and notifies the assessment organisation

·Facilitates the end-point assessment (i.e. provides accommodation)

·Supports the assessor during the professional discussion

 

Training Provider that must be an ITT provider accredited by the National College of Teaching and Leadership / DfE

·Provides on-going education and training for the apprentice

·Provides tools and processes to support the apprentice throughout the training programme, prior to the gateway

·Carries out regular reviews with the apprentice and the employer

·Advises the employer when the apprentice is ready to go through the gateway

·Supports the assessor during the professional discussion

 

Assessment Organisation that must be an ITT provider accredited by the National College of Teaching and Leadership / DfE

·Takes no part in the training or employment of those apprentices for whom they complete end-point assessment

·Devises assessment materials

·Decides when the end-point assessment is to be conducted and administers the end-point assessment

·Decides whether the end-point assessment is to be deferred

·Recruits and trains independent assessors

·Ensures assessors are occupationally competent, are able to assess the performance of the apprentice using the end-point assessment method and are able to determine the grade achieved

·Have, and implement, a clear policy on Reasonable Adjustments and Special Considerations

·Maintains robust internal quality assurance processes

·Actively participates in the internal moderation and external quality assurance procedures described in this assessment plan

 

Assessor

·Assesses the lesson observation

·Assesses the professional discussion

·Determines the final apprenticeship grade

 

Quality Assurance

Assessment organisations that deliver end-point assessments for the teaching apprenticeship must be accepted by the Education and Skills Funding Agency onto the Register of End-Point Assessment Organisations. They must also be ITT providers accredited by the NCTL / DfE.

Organisations listed on the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Register of Apprentice Assessment Organisations will develop the assessments and supporting materials. Assessments are designed to produce outcomes that are consistent with the Teaching Standards, are reliable and valid, and allow fair and proper comparison between apprentices employed in different types and sizes of organisations, over time.

Only assessors appointed by organisations on the Register of End-Point Assessment Organisations are able to carry out end-point assessment.

When providers bid for accreditation, NCTL look for evidence that appropriately experienced individuals will be undertaking mentoring and assessment, and that there is appropriate training for these individuals ahead of the first year of delivery of the programme. Therefore, assessors must:

  • work for an ITT provider accredited by the National College of Teaching and Leadership, rated as good or outstanding by OFSTED;
  • be conversant with the OFSTED criteria for Initial Teacher Training; and
  • be familiar with NABTT’s assessment guidance.

 

Internal moderation 

Internal moderation provides a system of checks and balances within a training partnership to ensure that trainees in different settings are assessed accurately and reliably. Assessment organisations must monitor, evaluate and moderate all aspects of provision rigorously and demonstrate how these contribute to securing improvements in the quality of training and the assessment of trainees, as set out in the initial teacher training criteria and supporting advice.

Assessment organisations should ensure that arrangements for internal moderation are in place and that they work effectively. The roles and responsibilities of those carrying out such arrangements should be set out in the ITT partnership agreement.

Assessment organisations are required, as a minimum, to:

  • Ensure they are accredited by NCTL
  • Appoint assessors that work for an ITT provider accredited by the National College of Teaching and Leadership, and that they are able to demonstrate relevant occupational experience
  • Produce relevant assessment tools and materials
  • Adhere to C3.4 of the Initial teacher training criteria and supporting advice
  • Ensure detailed scrutiny by a moderating panel of a sample of apprentices, including all those judged by an assessor as on the pass/fail borderline
  • Ensure lessons of 10% of apprentices are jointly observed by two assessors from the same organisation

 

External Quality Assurance

External quality assurance will be provided by the Universities Council for the Education of Teachers (UCET), in partnership with the National Association of School-Based Teacher Trainers (NASBTT).

 

End-point Grading

The successful apprentice receives an overall grade of outstanding, pass or inadequate, which is determined by the independent assessor. Each assessment method will be graded outstanding, pass or inadequate. The overall grade is determined by the grades achieved for the two elements of the assessment and applying a higher weighting to the grade awarded for the professional discussion (60:40, professional discussion: lesson observation). The apprentice must achieve a minimum grade of ‘pass’ in both elements of the end assessment to be awarded an overall grade of at least a pass.

The final judgement on the competency of the apprentice and the overall grade rests with the independent assessor.

The scoring criteria for each grade is detailed below; detailed guidance will be developed by end-point assessment organisations, with consideration given to OFSTED’s Initial Teacher Education inspection handbook and NASBTT’s assessment guidance. Each knowledge, skill and behaviour is of equal weight.

The Teachers’ Standards apply throughout a teacher’s career, so consideration must be given to what is reasonably expected of a Newly Qualified Teacher when awarding the grades below.

Outstanding

The trainee, awarded QTS, exceeds the minimum level of practice expected of teachers as defined in the Teachers’ Standards. The trainee exceeds the minimum level of practice in the majority of the standards for teaching and all related to their personal and professional conduct. The quality of the trainee’s teaching is outstanding.

For a trainee’s final grade to be outstanding:

– Pupil progress and learning must be good or better than expected

A minimum of five standards must be graded outstanding overall or four standards graded outstanding overall but many features of other standards (performance against the sub-headings) also graded outstanding

– All other standards must be graded pass, with no standards graded inadequate

Trainees demonstrate:

– strong subject and curriculum knowledge;

– Key Stage expertise; and

– the ability to use a range of teaching and learning strategies to great effect;

– accurate assessment of achievement using new curricula, continuous assessment and summative tests, examinations and assessment arrangements

– the ability to manage behaviour effectively and create an excellent climate for learning;

– demonstrate an understanding of and take responsibility for promoting high standards of literacy, articulacy and the correct use of standard English, whatever the teacher’s specialism;

– understand the causes of low achievement; challenge and motivate children/pupils/learners where attainment is low; and use effective strategies to support underperforming groups; and

– high standards of personal and professional conduct.

Pass

The trainee, awarded QTS, meets the minimum level of practice expected of teachers as defined in the Teachers’ Standards. The trainee demonstrates occupational competence in all of the standards for teaching and all related to their personal and professional conduct. The quality of the trainee’s teaching is acceptable.

All standards must be graded as at least a ‘Pass’, with no standard graded as ‘Inadequate’. Apprentices at a Pass level may have some outstanding features, but only a minority of the Knowledge, Skills and Behaviours will be graded as outstanding. The majority will demonstrate occupational competence.

Inadequate

The trainee fails to meet the minimum level of practice expected of teachers as defined in the Teachers’ Standards. The quality of the trainee’s teaching is weak and does not demonstrate occupational competence.

The assessor should complete a Final Assessment by Assessor form, which should be used to give strong and specific examples under each of the Teachers’ Standards, which will inform judgements on the trainee’s outcome and future development needs. Evidence will come from the lesson observation with professional dialogue and professional discussion. Evidence should be concise, specific and evaluative, not descriptive.

 

Implementation Of The Apprenticeship Assessment

 Affordability, Manageability And Feasibility

Guidance from Government organisations anticipate that the cost of the independent assessment will form approximately 14%, and not more than 20%, of the overarching cost of the apprenticeship standard. Having reviewed this ourselves, we believe that our many years of experience, expertise and provision within the sector, will enable us to deliver a well-informed, knowledgeable and efficient end point assessment of postgraduate teaching apprentices for approximately 10% of the overarching cost of the apprenticeship standard and therefore PCP will offer End Point Assessment at a cost of £750 for each apprentice, plus travel of 35p per mile.

Review

In line with the teacher apprenticeship standard, this end-point assessment plan will be reviewed 1 year from approval.

 

PCP acknowledges that much of this document draws on document SG0490/AP01

https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/media/1470/teacher-apprenticeship-assessment-plan_revised-clean-version.pdf